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Dr James Price

James Price

Dr James Price (MBBS MRCP PhD FRCPath)

NIHR Clinical Lecturer
E: J.Price3@bsms.ac.uk

Area of expertise: Infectious Diseases, Microbiology, healthcare-associated infection, Staphylococcus aureus, antimicrobial resistance, whole-genome sequencing 
Research areas: Transmission of healthcare-associated infection, global antimicrobial resistance, application of novel molecular technologies
BACKGROUND IMAGE FOR PANEL

Biography

James graduated in Medicine from St. George’s Hospital Medical School, London, in 2005. He undertook an Academic Foundation Programme in Infectious Diseases and Microbiology where he began his research in healthcare-associated infection. Following on from this James was awarded a prestigious Walport NIHR Academic Clinical Fellowship during which he successfully completed a PhD in collaboration with UKCRC Modernising Medical Microbiology (MMM) consortium based at the University of Oxford. His work included an evaluation of the utility of whole-genome sequencing to inform S. aureus infection in a healthcare setting. 

James is currently an Infectious Diseases and Microbiology registrar in the Kent, Surrey and Sussex Deanery. James is a member of the Royal College of Physicians and a fellow of the Royal College of Pathologists. In 2014 James was appointed as a NIHR Clinical Lecturer where he continues to develop his research in healthcare-associated S. aureus carriage and transmission. 
James is a Council member of the Healthcare Infection Society (HIS) and continues as Professional Affairs Representative and Chair of the HIS trainee committee. 

Research

James’ research is focused on prevention of healthcare-associated infection, including S. aureus and other multi-drug resistant organisms. His work utilises molecular technologies (including whole-genome sequencing) and epidemiological data to evaluates carriage, acquisition and transmission of pathogens in healthcare settings, with the aim of developing interventions to reduce nosocomial infections. 

James is actively involved in multiple collaborative projects including: 

  • International Research Partnerships and Network (IPRN) which aims to unites international scientists to advance understanding and cross-disciplinary research of antimicrobial resistance
  • Sussex Sustainability Research Programme: building global surveillance with local data. This is an international cross-disciplinary collaborative project evaluating microbiological and social factors impacting on antimicrobial resistance.
  • European Committee on Infection Control (ECIC), as part of the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID), where he leads the development of evidence-based guidelines on management of multi-drug resistant Gram-negative organisms.

James’ awards include the British Infection Association’s Barnett Christie prize for excellence in original research, the Royal College of Pathologist’s Research Medal in Microbiology for best published research and the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases Young Investigator Award for acknowledging excellence in research. 

James currently supervises research projects for medical, MSc and PhD students.

BACKGROUND IMAGE FOR PANEL

Teaching

James teaches infectious diseases, microbiology and global health to undergraduate medical and MSc students and post-graduate clinicians.

Selected publications

Young B, Wu C-H, Gordon NC, Cole K, Price JR, Liu E, Sheppard A, Perera S, Charlesworth J, Golubchik T, Iqbal Z, Bowden R, Massey RC, Paul J, Crook DW, Peto TEA, Walker AS, Llewelyn MJ, Wyllie DH, Wilson DJ. Severe infections emerge from the microbiome by adaptive evolution. eLifeSciences. 2017

Ledda A, Price JR, Cole K, Llewelyn MJ, Kearns AM, Crook DW, Paul J, Didelot X. Re-emergence of methicillin susceptibility in a resistant lineage of Staphylococcus aureus. J Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (2017) dkw570

Price JR, Cole K, Bexley A, Kostiou V, Eyre DW, Golubchik T, Wilson DJ, Crook DW, Walker AS, Peto TEA, Llewelyn MJ, Paul J. Transmission of Staphylococcus aureus between healthcare workers, the environment and patients in an intensive care unit: a whole-genome sequencing based longitudinal cohort study. Lancet ID. 2016;S1473-3099(16):30413-3

Price JR, Golubchik T, Wilson DJ, Crook DW, Walker AS, Peto TE, Paul J, Llewelyn MJ. Reply to Mills and Linkin. Clinical Infectious Diseases 2014; 59(5):752-3. doi: 10.1093/cid/ciu370

Gordon NC, Price JR, Cole K, Everitt R, Morgan M, Finney J, Kearns AM, Pichon B, Young B, Wilson DJ, Llewelyn MJ, Paul J, Peto TE, Crook DW, Walker AS, Golubchik T. Prediction of Staphylococcus aureus antimicrobial resistance from whole genome sequencing. Journal of Clinical Microbiology. 2014; 52(4): 1182-1191

Miller R, Price JR, Batty E, Didelot X, Wyllie D, Golubchik T, Crook DW, Paul J, Peto TEA, Wilson DJ, Cule M, Ip C, Day NPJ, Moore CE, Bowden R, Llewelyn MJ Healthcare-associated outbreak of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia: role of a cryptic variant of an epidemic clone. Journal of Hospital Infection 2014; 86(2): 83-9.

Price JR, Golubchik T, Cole K, Wilson DJ, Crook DW, Thwaites GE, Bowden R, Walker AS, Peto TE, Paul J, Llewelyn MJ. Whole-genome sequencing shows that patient-to-patient transmission rarely accounts for acquisition of Staphylococcus aureus in an intensive care unit. Clinical Infectious Diseases. 2014;58(5):609-18

Price JR, Gordon NC, Crook DW, Llewelyn MJ, Paul J. (2012) The usefulness of whole genome sequencing in Staphylococcus aureus infection. Clinical Microbiology and Infection 2013;19(9):784-9

Price JR, Didelot X, Crook DW, Llewelyn MJ, Paul J. Whole genome sequencing in the prevention and control of Staphylococcus aureus infection. Journal of Hospital Infection 2013;83(1):14-21

Price J, Atkinson S, Llewelyn M, Paul J. Paradoxical Relationship between Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia clinical outcome and Vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration. Clinical Infectious Diseases 2009;48(7):997-8